Strikes follows as government tries to chase truckers

The Brazilian government decided to convoke the National Force to release the highways after the truckers strike counted over two weeks in the country. At BR-101, the highways which divides the states of Santa Catarina, the Brazilian Federal Police had to use force to chase truckers.

But the strike continues in several stretches of roads in Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, Paraná, Minas Gerais, Goiás, and Mato Grosso – all states with significant agricultural production. In several municipalities of Rio Grande do Sul, street stores closed doors in solidarity to truckers. Milk producers in the state have also joined the truckers movement.

A survey with 540 Mato Grosso farmers revealed that nearly 20% of farmers cannot have access to diesel because of lack of supply.


Some roads are unblocked, but strike remains in Brazil

After a meeting with some unions, the Brazilian government announced that truckers would be exempted from tolls in the future and that Petrobras would not increase diesel prices in the next six months. Some unions agreed to end the strike with the measures announced, but other truckers promised to continue to be on strike. Trucker Ivar Schmidt said in an interview to Veja magazine: “We are working with zero profit and now the government says we will have six months more like this. […] I will stand firm and will go to Brasília until the problem gets solved.”

Some state courts imposed that the roads should be unblocked as soon as possible, but truckers announced that they will stop in different stretches of highways not mentioned by the Justice.

In Rio Grande do Sul, Paraná, and Santa Catarina, all the major highways continue to be blocked. Federal highway BR-163 is also still blocked in Mato Grosso. Nearly 20% of Mato Grosso farmers do not have more fuel to follow with harvest.


Some roads are unblocked, but strike remains in Brazil

After a meeting with some unions, the Brazilian government announced that truckers would be exempted from tolls in the future and that Petrobras would not increase diesel prices in the next six months. Some unions agreed to end the strike with the measures announced, but other truckers promised to continue to be on strike. Trucker Ivar Schmidt said in an interview to Veja magazine: “We are working with zero profit and now the government says we will have six months more like this. […] I will stand firm and will go to Brasília until the problem gets solved.”

Some state courts imposed that the roads should be unblocked as soon as possible, but truckers announced that they will stop in different stretches of highways not mentioned by the justice.

In Rio Grande do Sul, Paraná, and Santa Catarina, all the major highways continue to be blocked. Federal highway BR-163 is also still blocked in Mato Grosso. Nearly 20% of Mato Grosso farmers do not have more fuel to follow with harvest.


Mato Grosso may speed up harvest, association says

The Association of Soybean Growers of Mato Grosso informed yesterday that the soybean harvest in that state will speed up this week. Based on the meteorological forecasts, the association anticipates that there will not be too much rain over the period.

According to the Mato Grosso Institute of Agricultural Economics, the state harvested 34.9 percent of the total surface until last Friday.


Brazil Strike Lights Fire Under Soybean Market

By Luís Vieira

PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil (Agriculture.com)–The biggest soybean truckers strike in 15 years has broken out in Brazil. It’s slowing soybean transportation and rallying the markets.

On Tuesday, the truckers strike fueled the CME Group’s May soybean futures up 26 cents to $10.32 per bushel. The Nov. soybean futures pushed up 20 cents to trade as high as $10.02 per bushel.

Early last week, truckers from the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso decided to go on a strike blocking two major federal highways, BR-163 and BR-364, which are the top roads for grain transport.

Read the full story at Agriculture.com


Harvest reaches 21% of total soybean surface in Brazil

According to a report released by França Júnior consultancy, the soybean harvest reached 21 percent of the total surface by last Friday. The most advanced state is Mato Grosso with 34 percent of the crop harvested – four percentage points below the five-year average.

Rains stopped works in states such as Goiás, Mato Grosso do Sul, Paraná, and Mato Grosso recently, but helped crop conditions in Rio Grande do Sul maintaining soil humidity.


Brazil: Truckers strike continues and spreads to seven states

A strike blocking roads that started in Mato Grosso has now spread to six other states and may last until the government announces some measures which could lower fuel prices. The movement has increased in the last few days and has already generated lack of gas and food supply in some locations of southern Brazil.

Currently, there is a peak of the grain harvest in the center-west of Brazil, but sales are slow yet because of low commodity prices. Trucker union did not show any will of stepping back. Cars or buses are not being impeded of going forward.


Soybean crop estimates still unchanged in Uruguay

Blasina y Asociados consultancy has a forecast of soybean production of 3.5 million tons for Uruguay. According to Eduardo Blasina, the consultancy’s director, the weather continues to be favorable and the crop still tends to be good. Last week, rains came at the right time with 1.3 inches of average in the country, Blasina revealed.


Brazil: soybean growers may go to the WTO against US Farm Bill

Soybean farmers in Brazil are assessing to go to the World Trade Organization to sue the White House in order to recover financial losses allegedly generated by the U.S. Farm Bill. Farm associations in Brazil say that if price subsidies are confirmed in the U.S., there will be disadvantages for the Brazilian counterparts. The fact that the program started to work in a year of historic low prices is considered more problematic.

“We do not have a decision yet. But these new subsidies are subject of worry and we are examining what can be done,” said Fabrício Rosa, executive director at the Brazil Association of Soybean Growers. These subsidies would have a negative impact of US$ 1.2 billion for Brazilian soybean growers and US$ 1 billion for corn producers, the association estimates.


Truckers block roads in Mato Grosso and four other states against fuel taxes

A strike to protest against hikes in fuel taxes started this week in Mato Grosso. Truckers blocked BR-163 and BR-364, two major highways that are used to transport soybeans, since Tuesday. The protest spread at least to four other states: Rio Grande do Sul, Paraná, Santa Catarina, and Goiás; all significant grains producers.

Currently, Mato Grosso is at the peak of the soybean harvest. The state governor, Pedro Taques, invited transportation companies for a meeting in which he may offer a state relief on diesel taxes and avoid the blockade of roads.